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Students visas – different visas = different requirements. Tips and advice on getting approved

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Depending on what you study and where you’re from can mean different requirements when applying for student visas. Each country’s assessment level can even vary depending on the whether you’re studying English, Vocational (Certificates, Diplomas and Advanced Diplomas) or University (Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Bachelor or Masters)

At EMSA, we have had a few new clients come into our offices in the last few weeks after their student visas have been refused because their education agents didn’t understand visa requirements. Student refusals can sometimes be overturned at the Migration Review Tribunal (MRT) but this can be a costly and long process that can easily be avoided if students get the right advice from the start.

Having a team of registered migration and education agents, means at EMSA, we know the requirements for all visas and can ensure clients have the best chance of success in their case.

Here are some tips for applying for a student visas based on the cases we’ve seen refused lately.

If you are from an assessment level 3 country (Colombia, Iran, Vietnam)  and are applying for a student visa to study a Diploma and Advanced Diploma course then this is what you need to show:

English language: 

If you’re apply for direct entry into the course, you need to have either:

International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Certificate

  • IELTS test score of:
    • 5.5 or above for direct entry into a course; or
    • 4.5 with an ELICOS course to be taken before your main course. You can study a preliminary English course for up to 30 weeks.

Note: You can take the Academic or General IELTS test to meet English Language requirements for a student visa. However, please check with your Australian education provider about which test they require for your enrolment.Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT) Certificate

  • Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic Certificate: PTE Academic score of:
    • 42 or above for direct entry into a course; or
    • 30 with an ELICOS course to be taken before your main course. You can study a preliminary English course for up to 30 weeks.
  • TOEFL iBT score of:
    • 46 or above for direct entry into a course; or
    • 32 with an ELICOS course to be taken before your main course. You can study a preliminary English course for up to 30 weeks.
  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) Certificate CAE test score of:
    • 47 or above for direct entry into a course; or
    •  36 with an ELICOS course to be taken before your main course. You can study a preliminary English course for up to 30 weeks
  • Occupational English Test (OET) Certificate:
    • OET score of ‘pass’
  • TOEFL Paper-Based Test Certificate : (This test is only acceptable if taken in one of the following countries where IELTS is not available: Belarus, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Kyrgyzstan, Mali, Moldova, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Uganda and Uzbekistan.) TOEFL PBT score of:
    • 527 or above for direct entry into a course; or • 450 with an ELICOS course to be taken before your main course. You can study a preliminary English course for up to 30 weeks.
    • 450 with an ELICOS course to be taken before your main course. You can study a preliminary English course for up to 30 weeks.
    • Note: Tests older than two years are not acceptable.

Study in English

You must provide evidence that you have:

  • studied in English for at least five years in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland, South Africa, United Kingdom or United States

or

  • within two years of your application date have successfully completed in Australia
    • a foundation course
    • a Senior Secondary Certificate of Education

or

  • a substantial part of a Certificate IV or higher level qualification, from the Australian Qualifications

So on the English front, if you have a Certificate IV that you gained in Australia you may not need IELTS and if you have an IELTS of 4.5 or 5 (or any other eligible English course above), then you can enrol in English before the diploma starts and still meet requirements.

Financials

Generally speaking, you’ll need to show financials including:

  • proof of money to support you and your family during your stay in Australia.
    • bank statements with money held for 3 months (if the bank had $20,000 in June but then went down to $15,000 in July and back to $20,000 in August, then the amount immigration may count is only $15,000)
  • proof of income for your sponsor – payslips, tax returns, etc

You’ll need to show:

  • $1550 per month for the main applicant
  • $550 per month for a partner
  • $310 per month for the first child
  • $240 per month for the second child

Types of financial support can come from:

  • a money deposit with a financial institution held by you, or an eligible family member, for at least three consecutive months immediately before the date of your visa application
  • a loan from a financial institution made to you or an eligible family member
  • a loan from your government
  • your proposed education provider
  • the Australian Government or an Australian State or Territory government
  • the government of a foreign country
  • a provincial or state government of a foreign country that has the written support of the national
  • an organisation gazetted by the Minister
  • an acceptable non-profit organisation
  • a multilateral agency.

Support letters should be written & signed by your sponsor and included in your application.

When applying for new student visas, at EMSA, we assist our clients (that we enrol to study) free of charge.

Contact us for a consultation today!

admin@emsaus.com or 07 3733-1566

Opinions

  1. Post comment

    IELTS is very important for those people who need to Study In UK . IELTS test methodology is really awesome. I agree that one should pass this test to be able to communicate in UK English. 

    ESOL training

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